How to Make Real Progress on your Work-in-Progress

Hi everyone,

Recently I’ve been making more progress than ever on my WIP. I’ve finally managed to get myself out of the rut that I fell into after my writing degree, and it feels so good to be back. I am definitely not a planner when it comes to writing. For some reason, I just can’t come up with decent plot points in the planning stage. My planning consists of lines I might use, characters, and moods, but never plot points. This has undoubtedly lead me into some dead ends, but it’s something that I haven’t been able to change, no matter how many hours I’ve spent trying.

In the past month or so, I have been focussing on how to get back on track, and I discovered how to work with my process, rather than against it. Here are a few tips that will hopefully help you to get out of a rut and make some significant progress on your work-in-progress.

 

1  Only stop if you know what is going to happen next

I used to only write until my inspiration fell flat, and then pack up shop for the day. Don’t do that! Stopping at a dead end meant that the next time I sat down to write, I felt defeated before I even wrote a word. Now, whenever I reach my writing target for the day (more on that later), I make sure that I know exactly which scene I will write the day after. I know that I said I’m not a planner, but I’ve found that right after reaching my target, I’m able to make a tiny, one-scene plan with the momentum that I still have from the writing session. This way, it’s much easier to slip straight back into it the next day.

“Writing is like driving at night in the fog. You can only see as far as your headlights, but you can make the whole trip that way.”
― E.L. Doctorow, Writers At Work: The Paris Review Interviews

 

2   Set flexible and realistic writing targets

Obviously we need to push ourselves if we ever want to finish anything, but I think it’s important to avoid being too rigid. I’ve found that for me, the best writing targets are small, attainable, and flexible. I feel so much better about my writing and myself if I manage to reach my goal every day. I keep my targets flexible by giving myself both a word target, and a time target. This means that every day, I will either write at least 1000 words, or work on the manuscript for at least three hours–whichever comes first. I’m not saying that you should only write when you feel inspired; I’m saying that if you’re not reaching your goal every day, you need to check in and see if you’re not working hard enough, or if your goal is simply unattainable for your lifestyle.

 

3  Find your routine and treat yourself!

Discover the power of a hot cup of tea, or the right song (try calming classical), or the perfect writing spot. Try to really enjoy the time that you set aside for your writing. My writing time is the only time that I can get out of my own head and live in someone else’s for a while. I have found that, by creating the ideal environment for my writing, it feels less like work and more like a treat.

I think it’s important to experiment a little to find out what works best for you. Are you a morning writer or a night writer? Do you work best at home or at the library? Are you a planner or an improviser? Once I really got to know my process, and worked with it rather than against it, I started making real progress on my manuscript.

 

I hope this has been helpful to you, and I wish you all the best.

Talk to me in the comments! What are you working on?

 

Thank you so much for reading,

Tamara Drazic

 

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4 thoughts on “How to Make Real Progress on your Work-in-Progress

  1. Hi Tamara,
    Thanks for these tips. I especially like the one about making writing more of a treat. I read an article yesterday about staying playful with writing, and that resonated with me too, because in my desire to improve and succeed at writing, I can get a bit tense and stodgy!
    Happy Sunday 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Hi Tamara,

    I agree very much item #2 at my work as a lawyer, planing is very important but so is being flexible and able to adapt. I normally set goals for the work week each Monday and check on them daily. This helps me keep track on my work, however not everything gets done all the time and the circumstances vary, usually being one task, such as reviewing contracts and preparing drafts, proves to be more work than originally planned for, so I adjust my goals on the fly and use a bit of time each monday to plan the week ahead and to renegotiate goals.

    Working hard is important, but so is to effectively manage your time and effort, so as you do not become frustrated.

    Hope you are doing ok!!!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks so much for commenting Hector! Yes I totally agree–it’s so important to manage your time right so that you don’t burn out completely! I guess these tips, especially #2, don’t just concern writing. I hope everything is going well for you! Thanks again 🙂

      Like

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